Talking about miscarriage: a therapist’s perspective

Can discussing miscarriage publicly help to break taboos? (Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono/

Can discussing miscarriage publicly help to break taboos? (Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono/

The response to Facebook CEO’s Mark Zuckerberg’s announcement that he and his wife are to have a baby girl – after three miscarriages – has been astounding. Not only is someone talking openly and publicly about miscarriage – but that someone is a man, a famous man. To start a discussion about miscarriage, says Zuckerberg: “Brings us together. It creates understanding and tolerance, and it gives us hope.” The alternative – not talking about miscarriage at all – leaves couples struggling in silence. “Most people don’t discuss miscarriages because you worry your problems will distance you or reflect upon you – as if you’re defective or did something to cause this. So you struggle on your own,” adds Zuckerberg.

The fact someone so well-known has come out and spoken about his losses has already sparked debate about how hidden the topic of miscarriage is – and why it shouldn’t remain a taboo any longer. While an estimated one in five pregnancies will end in miscarriage, couples who have lost their baby during early to mid pregnancy rarely talk about it. The rule is that no one announces a pregnancy until the crucial 12-week scan, and so many early miscarriages are never known, revealed or discussed.

Zuckerberg is right when he says that discussing the topic can “distance you or reflect upon you – as if you’re defective or have done something to cause it”. As a counsellor working with women – and men – affected by miscarriage, a core theme to their loss is that other people really don’t want to know. They may show empathy at the start, when they discover the news, but will often feel awkward about it. The person who has miscarried frequently finds herself taking care of the feelings of others around her, because pregnancy loss is a difficult concept to understand or accept.

The tacit expectation is often that the couple are meant to “get over it” quickly because it “wasn’t an actual baby anyway”. Yet that little bundle of cells that became an embryo and started bringing symptoms of morning sickness – and then suddenly lost its heartbeat – contained the hopes and dreams of a couple planning for a real, live, actual human being to become part of their lives.

Therapists like me hear the stories of dozens of people affected by miscarriage, often because no one else around them (friends and sometimes family) wants to listen. Miscarriage is one of my specialist areas as a counsellor and psychotherapist. What I’ve learned is that ‘the world’ doesn’t/can’t/won’t understand that a miscarriage is a major loss and requires a process of grieving in order to come to terms with it. (more…)

Survey proves that miscarriage is the same as losing a child

Miscarriage still carries so much shame and taboo. (pic: theresajam1)

Miscarriage still carries so much shame and taboo. (pic: theresajam1)

I always find it a curiosity that so many people do not take a miscarriage as seriously or as sympathetically as a death. But a new survey carried out in the US shows that two-thirds (66%) of men and women who have experienced a miscarriage say that it carries the emotional equivalent to losing a child.

I’m amazed it is only two-thirds. A treasured, hoped-for life has been lost. The plans for the future have been scuppered. The rounded belly of impending motherhood has been punctured. And then comes the shame of failure, the sadness of lost hope, and the blame and guilt for what they could have done differently. 

Why it’s time to talk about miscarriage

miscarriage association

Blue letters in The Miscarriage Association’s campaign show the randomness of miscarriage.

If you’ve been through a miscarriage, you know how terrified and powerless you can feel. To lose a precious baby, no matter how many weeks’ pregnant you are, can be devastating. And it all feels so random. You may be asking: why me?

That randomness has been highlighted in a campaign by The Miscarriage Association to get people talking about miscarriage. The charity has left blue envelopes scattered around, addressed ‘to anyone’, to show just how random miscarriage can be. An estimated one in four pregnancies ends in miscarriage. And 79% receive no support afterwards.

The Miscarriage Association is encouraging people to open up about their miscarriage. So often, the sympathy of family and friends can wane after you lose a baby, or they feel embarrassed or ashamed to talk about it. The person who has miscarried can feel very isolated and alone. They can feel a failure. Talking to someone who understands can help to carry and share that sadness and heal some of the pain.

The words of Anna Raeburn, Patron of The Miscarriage Association, are very touching: Apart from loss, the most painful aspects of miscarriage are failure and grief. If you can talk about your feelings and be met with patient sympathy, you can heal.”

The Miscarriage Association’s helpline is 01924 200799, open Monday to Friday 9am to 4pm.

anima counselling also offers support and psychotherapy to people affected by miscarriage. Email to arrange an initial chat.